It’s Not What You Think

Rich Larsen wrote a very nice tribute to Chris Cornell that discusses what grunge music is really about. Please read it by following the link below.

“You might think grunge is about anger, but that’s not completely true. Yes, it can sound that way, but it’s really about depression and cynicism. Those two go hand-in-hand, along with their nasty little sister, anxiety. When the three of them get going, they just eat hope as quickly as it can be summoned. That leaves despair and despair is exhausting, not just for those who experience it, but for the people around it as well. So we keep it to ourselves because we don’t want to be a burden. And then it gets to be too much. Doesn’t matter if you’re a student, a mom, an accountant or a rock star. It doesn’t matter if you’ve written about it your entire life as a means of keeping it at bay. It doesn’t matter if the music you made about it brought in fame, respect and millions of dollars. It doesn’t matter if your entire generation has suffered from it. Depression makes you feel totally alone. You hit the breaking point, and then, like Chris Cornell, you die alone in the bathroom.”

Source: It’s not what you think

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Mental Health First Aid

Thanks to Kalamazoo County Community Mental Health & Substance Abuse Services (KCMHSAS) for providing me with a full scholarship to attend this training, I went to an 8-hour Adult Mental Health First Aid course yesterday afternoon. According to their website, this course “teaches you how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. The training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial help and support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem or experiencing a crisis.”

The program was initially developed in Australia and has since been adapted for use in over 20 countries, including the United States. The main goal is to equip people with the tools they need to start a dialogue about mental health so that individuals who are in crisis can get the help that they need.

“Most of us would know how to help if we saw someone having a heart attack—we’d start CPR, or at the very least, call 9-1-1. But too few of us would know how to respond if we saw someone having a panic attack or if we were concerned that a friend or co-worker might be showing signs of alcoholism.

Mental Health First Aid takes the fear and hesitation out of starting conversations about mental health and substance use problems by improving understanding and providing an action plan that teaches people to safely and responsibly identify and address a potential mental illness or substance use disorder.” The Mental Health Action Plan utilizes the following acronym: ALGEE (pronounced like the word, “algae”)

  • Action A: Assess for risk of suicide or harm
  • Action L: Listen nonjudgmentally
  • Action G: Give reassurance and information
  • Action E: Encourage appropriate professional help
  • Action E: Encourage self-help and other support strategies

In the course, we learned the signs and symptoms of depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal behavior, non-suicidal self-harm, psychosis, and substance use disorders. We did a lot of group work, where we were given hypothetical situations and asked to use the Mental Health Action Plan to determine how to help the individuals in our case studies. We learned that the action plan is non-linear, meaning that you don’t necessarily complete all of the steps in order and you don’t have to complete all of the steps in each situation.

There were a dozen individuals in the class with me and the majority of them are social workers, but there were a few people who work outside of the mental health/substance abuse field, including business professionals, a college student and so on. I think that everyone found the course to be helpful. Much of the material seemed like common sense to me, but that may be because I have lived a lot of it. I found it interesting listening to people talk about the signs and symptoms. For example, we did an activity related to hearing voices (psychosis) in which we broke into groups of three and two people had a conversation with each other while the third person whispered into one of the other people’s ears. Everyone was shocked at how distracting this is but I have experienced auditory hallucinations, so I was not very surprised. I’m glad that it helped them to better understand what an individual that is hearing voices might be experiencing.

I think that the most important activity of the day was breaking into groups of two for role playing, having a conversation with a friend that we think might be suicidal, and asking them directly, “Are you having thoughts of suicide?” or “Are you thinking about killing yourself?” This activity is required in the course because how can we help someone who is suicidal if we can’t even ask them if we are? I had never said those words out loud and it was hard but we all did it and now I know that I can. I guess I just assumed that I would be able to do it before. We learned not to ask vague questions such as, “Are you thinking about harming yourself?” or “You’re not planning on doing anything crazy, are you?” because the individual may not see suicide as harmful or crazy. We need to be very direct. If the person says “yes,” there are four follow-up questions to ask:

  1. Do you have a plan?
  2. Have you decided when you would do it?
  3. Have you collected the things you need to carry out your plan?
  4. Do you have another plan?

I’m going to share two crisis resources here.

  • The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is 1-800-273-TALK (8255). It is “a national network of local crisis centers that provides free and confidential emotional support to people in suicidal crisis or emotional distress 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.”
  • The Crisis Text Line is a 24/7 anonymous service for anyone experiencing any kind of crisis. Text 741741 or message them on Facebook and you will be connected to a trained counselor. If your cell phone plan is with AT&T, T-Mobile, Sprint, or Verizon, texts to 741741 are free of charge. If you have a plan with a different carrier, standard text message rates apply.

We covered a lot of material throughout the day, but we didn’t have to try to memorize everything because we were given a copy of the book, “Mental Health First Aid USA” to keep. It’s full of information about mental health conditions, plus statistics and vetted resources. KCMHSAS also provided us with a detailed resource list specific to our county.

If you’re able to attend a Mental Health First Aid training, I highly recommend it. Did you know that 19.6% of American adults (1 in 5) have a mental disorder in a given year? This is equivalent to 45.6 million people. These types of disorders can have a huge impact on their education, work, relationships, and health. Early intervention can greatly reduce the impact and first aiders can make a big difference by helping individuals that are in crisis to have their needs met. Can you imagine what the world would be like if we had as many people trained in Mental Health First Aid as we do in First Aid and CPR?

Shameless

I started watching Shameless on Netflix about a month ago and I am halfway through season 5 already. I like it for several reasons, one of which is the excellent portrayal of bipolar disorder in both Monica and Ian Gallagher. Spoiler alert: if you haven’t watched through season 5 episode 8, you may want to skip this post for now.

I didn’t “get” Monica until the Thanksgiving dinner episode, at which time I knew as soon as she stood up from the table that she was going to do something terrible. In terms of “highs” and “lows,” I spend most of my time depressed and I tend to get suicidal. Unfortunately, I also get impulsive. As Monica and Ian show us, depressed + suicidal + impulsive = danger.

When Ian was acting strange after going MIA from the army, I wasn’t sure if it was drugs or mania but when he wouldn’t get out of bed for days, I knew.

The one thing that I would say is that my experience in psych wards was slightly different from what Monica and Ian experienced. I have been in three different wards. Two things:

  1. Psych wards have nightly “checks,” in which hospital staff look into your room at night to make sure that you are in bed, okay, and that you’re not getting into trouble. So, Monica’s nighttime sexytime with the other patient is something that isn’t likely to happen.
  2. The guard at the hospital got rough with Ian. I have never experienced or witnessed unnecessary force in a psych ward. I’m sure that it happens, but I don’t think it is common.

I’m up to the point where Ian says that he flushed his meds because they make him feel awful. If you have never taken medicine for a mental illness, you can’t possibly understand what it’s like. And you can’t understand what it’s like to live with a mental illness if you don’t have one, but this show can help you to get a feeling for it. It’s refreshing to see bipolar accurately portrayed in a show. I tried watching Homeland, a series in which Claire Danes plays a CIA agent with bipolar disorder. I thought that show did okay, but Shameless does much better. Consider watching it.