I Found Some Hope!

Have I mentioned that I’ve been struggling with depression for the past month or so? I’m trying to avoid going to the hospital and it has been tough, but today I discovered a potentially helpful community resource.

My day started with 3 fillings at my dentist. With 2/3 of my mouth numb, plus my right eye, ear, and my nose, I sat in my car after my appointment and tried to figure out what to do for the rest of the day before dance practice. I had 7 hours to blow. I sat in my car for a good 45 minutes, basking in the sunlight on Michigan’s first warm spring day of the year and farting off my unfortunate breakfast choice, as I tried to decide whether I should drive home (a 30-minute commute) and sleep off the anesthesia or parade my crooked smile around Salvation Army, looking for deals on stuff that I didn’t need. I finally left with no plan, but then remembered that I had seen a mental health office on my drive in. I would pop in and see what they offered!

With a VERY wonky face, dental chair hair, and (probably) a faint eau de fart aroma about me, I walked into Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services. No, I’m not Christian. But I am desperate and I would hope that my treatment wouldn’t be heavily peppered with religion. Anyway, the receptionist kindly informed me that their office only offers therapy, med management, and a substance abuse group. I’m looking for bipolar and/or depression groups and possibly partial (day) hospitalization. She made it sound as if the other local branch offered day hospitalization, so I drove there. I could have just called, but I have a stupid aversion to talking on the phone.

The next place was the same story, but they were kind enough to suggest the Elizabeth Upjohn Community Healing Center. So I drove there. This place was the same deal as the first, but with more substance abuse options, plus child therapy. Have I mentioned that every time I open my mouth to speak, the right side of my mouth and face doesn’t move? The reaction from the various people that I interacted with was pretty comical. Usually a look of slight confusion and then terror. Anyway, this time I was referred to the local DBSA  (Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance) chapter. I had to call :(. Nobody answered, but there was a message stating when their group meets (Mondays from 7-9 pm). I was really hoping to find something during the day, when my husbeast is not home with me. He works a lot of hours and I usually only get to spend 3 hours per night with him + Sunday and sometimes I see him on his day off, depending on which day that falls on.

So, feeling like I was at a road block, I got on my phone and tried to see if there was a DBSA chapter in the neighboring county. I’m not clear on the answer to that, but I stumbled across the local NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) chapter, which listed several support groups in my area for family members of individuals living with mental illness (a good find, although not sure the husbeast will ever be able to do it due to his work schedule) AND I read about the Recovery Institute of Southwest Michigan, Inc.

Sorry that this story has gotten so long! Here’s the point: this sounds like exactly what I need right now. The Recovery Institute of Southwest Michigan, Inc. is a peer-run non-profit organization for individuals that are embracing recovery. There are weekly peer support groups for substance abuse, addictive behaviors, mental illness, for veterans, and for members of the LGBTQ community. There are ongoing wellness classes such as “whole health action management,” tobacco reduction, writing about recovery, meditation, yoga, and even an “open studio” time, when people can play games, play music, and share skills with each other. There is individual peer support and recovery coaching available, as well as special events and activities like computer lab, reading and writing tutoring, access to the local YMCA gym and pool, movie screenings, workshops, luncheons, and field trips. All of these resources are available to me for FREE, thanks to individuals like myself who volunteer to make the Recovery Institute work.

I picked up the March and April schedules, and I have so many good options! And all of them are during the day. I look forward to embarking on this new leg of my recovery. I’m sure that I will meet some great people and learn a lot about myself and others.

Do you participate in any groups to help you manage your mental illness? What are you doing on your own to manage your symptoms?

Dr. Copeland’s Concepts Essential to Self-Help

Concepts that are essential to self-help, according to Dr. Mary Ellen Copeland:

  1. There is hope. It is only when you feel and believe that you are fragile and out of control that you find it hard to move forward.
  2. It’s up to you to take responsibility for your own wellness.
  3. Education is a process that must accompany you on this journey.
  4. You must advocate for yourself to get what it is you want, need, and deserve.
  5. Support is essential.

Source: Copeland, M.E. (2002). The Depression Workbook: A Guide for Living with Depression and Manic Depression (2nd Ed.). Oakland: New Harbinger Publications, Inc.

I wish that someone had told me these five things the very first time that I experienced symptoms of bipolar disorder. I kind of want to have them printed on a card that will fit in my wallet so that I can remind myself of these concepts when needed and even share this knowledge with others that may benefit from it. I was going to talk about which aspects I think are the most important, but they are equally crucial. What do you think? Is there anything that you would add to the list?